Give us this day our daily Google

Look under the hood of Google Chrome in this comics interpretation of key engineering decisions, by Scott McCloud.
Google Launches its browser. Look under the hood of Google Chrome in this comics interpretation of key engineering decisions, by Scott McCloud.
The Google Debate Rages On!
Ice Breaker IdeaGive us this day our daily Google
I recommend highly this discussion for an ice breaker topic with students in the classroom or faculty development round table sessions. Most everyone knows about Google and has opinions on Google. Start by having participants list the ways they use Google and the Google applications they have tried. Have the participants stand. Ask those to sit down if they use Google more than 10 times a day. Ask the remaining to sit down if they use Google daily. Next, progress down the line of questioning with a few times a week, a couple times a month, now and then. See if any of the participants remain standing. Have them share why they don’t use Google. Keep it light and fun, so no one feels as if they are put on the spot. You can do that same by asking them about their use of Google applications. Open the floor for discussion on Google in education and in our daily lives. Provide resources on using Goggle applications in the classroom. Read the following articles for references and topic ideas:
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Is Google Making Us Stupid?
A few months ago we featured the article, Is Google Making Us Stupid? What the Internet is doing to our brains, by Nicholas Carr. http://www.theatlantic.com/doc/200807/google, The Atlantic.Com.
Read the responses in our What Google is Doing to Our Brains in the Web 2.0 Epsilen forum (please join and contribute) and on my Web 2.0 blog entry, “The Big Bad Google Monster” at https://nancywozniak.wordpress.com/from-the-mind-of-woz/the-big-bad-google-monster/
NOTE: Don’t get upset with my use of the term Luddite. I don’t like the label, but for my review of Carr’s article, I made an exception. Here is my opinion on the label Luddite – https://nancywozniak.wordpress.com/from-the-mind-of-woz/visionaries-vs-luddites/

Give Us This Day Our Daily Google:
NPR’s, Sarah Handel remarks about Google in her life, “– it’s just so darn useful, that I tend to think of it as more of a utility, like water and electricity, than a commercial product… “ – http://www.npr.org/blogs/talk/2008/09/i_cant_quit_you_google.html. Here another take on how Google has become part of our daily sustenance by Rob Dubbin of the Colbert Report (warning: might not be an article for K-12).
Can You Go A Day Without Google?
Google marked its 10th birthday on Sunday. In honor of the day, writer Rob Dubbin decided to see if he could go 24 hours without using the search engine. His article
“Just Let Me Check One Last Thing”
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/09/05/AR2008090502654.html
appeared Sunday in the Washington Post.

Blog of the Nation – I Can’t Quit You, Google
All Things Considered, September 7, 2008
It’s not often that a product or service becomes so pervasive that people start using it as a verb. On the 10th anniversary of Google, take a look back on its influence through the lens of popular culture.
Listen to the NPR broadcast at http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=94392120
and join the read the blog entries at
http://www.npr.org/blogs/talk/2008/09/i_cant_quit_you_google.html
VERY INTERESTING TOPIC!
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Google Chrome Reviews
Nicole, a colleague at work, and I were discussing Michael Piotrowski’s (University of Toledo) announcement post in our Web 2.0 Epsilen Group about the use of Google Chrome for research papers. We both agreed that it’s too new … the jury is still out. I’m creating a forum and a wiki on Google Chrome in the Epsilen Group.

Michael posts, “I wondered if anyone had any inside opinions about the new Google Chrome. Will it make it easier for students to write research papers for my college courses?”

Our Epsilen colleagues, Bob Harbort, Melanie Reed, Mike Pouraryan have responded and I am posting their responses in the Give us this day our daily Google Web 2.0 Epsilen forum. Whether you plan to use Google or not, please join and contribute.

What is it?
Some of you may be asking, “What is Google Chrome?” It’s a browser in its baby (beta) stages. Here’s Wikipedia’s entry – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Google_Chrome
I’ve been listening to NPR reviews of Chrome on Morning Edition, Talk of the Nation and All things Considered. NPR is a good place to start. Try these sources:

Google’s ‘Shiny’ New Web Browser
NPR.org, September 2, 2008 by Joshua Brockman (RBW – Recommended by Woz)
When Google unveiled its new browser on Tuesday, it was touted as a faster and more reliable experience for those using the Web for everything from e-mail and word processing, to music and video. Go to http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=94211079

Google’s Chrome Taps Browsers’ Cash Potential
Morning Edition, September 9, 2008 • Google is taking on Microsoft’s ubiquitous Internet Explorer with a new browser called Chrome. Technology commentator Mario Armstrong says it’s an easy to use, open-source browser that has a long way to go before it could oust Explorer as the No. 1 browser. Listen at http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=94407506

Google Launches ‘Chrome’ Web Browser
Talk of the Nation, September 5, 2008
Internet search giant Google unveiled Chrome, a new piece of Web browser software on Tuesday. Danny Sullivan, editor-in-chief of SearchEngineLand.com, explains what Google’s open-source browser can do, and why a search engine leader wants to get into the Web software market.
Listen at http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=94299337

Visit the Google Chrome download page and introduction in comic book and video form at
http://www.google.com/chrome/intl/en/features.html

I.E. is Still #1! Let’s see how long it will take Google to overtake them.
Top Five Web Browsers By Market Share
Internet Explorer – 72.2 %
Firefox – 19.7 %
Safari – 6.4 %
Opera – 0.74 %
Netscape- 0.72 %

Source: Net Applications

Web Conferencing Tools for Online and Blended Education

I sent out the following request over our Web 2.0 Group’s message system:“I need suggestions for web-based applications that can be used in online language courses. It is important to one of my language professors that the class is able to hear and see one another….audio and video.  She places an emphasis on the movements of the mouth when pronouncing words. I’d appreciate recommendations and advice from my Epsilen colleagues.”
Synchronous:

·         Skype Videohttp://www.skype.com/getconnected/  (free)   audio/video
I (Nancy Wozniak) want to experiment with this application for online or blended language courses.  I’m hearing good things about it from my colleagues in the U.K. and U.S.A.  http://www.skype.com/allfeatures/videocall/#high-quality-video    Suggested by Clark Shah-Nelson (SUNY Delhi), Marianne Dombroski (New York Times), Mike Lane (Portland State University), Clark Shah-Nelson (SUNY Delhi).

·         The Flashmeeting Projecthttp://flashmeeting.open.ac.uk/home.html  (free)  audio/video
This one is new and highly recommended by  Clark Shah-Nelson (SUNY Delhi).  Clark is experimenting with this application for meetings.  I’d like to try it.

·         Facebook – http://www.facebook.com
Clark Shah-Nelson (SUNY Delhi) wrote, “

·         Elluminate (vroom) – http://www.elluminate.com/vroom/index.jsp  (3-person Elluminate solution called Vroom for free— There is a cost for upgrade.)   audio/video
Htay L. Hla (U of Arizona) , Marianne Dombroski (New York Times,  Clark Shah-Nelson (SUNY Delhi) and Susan Woerner (SUNY Broome)suggested Elluminate as a possibility

·         DimDim.com – http://www.dimdim.com/ (free) audio/video
Marianne Dombroski , New York Times, suggests this as a possibility but has heard mixed reviews on the use of the application.

·          Vyew – http://vyew.com/site/  (Free) audio and video
Mike Paige (Cleveland State Community College) has tried it, but loves Wimba LC (licensing fee).

·         Adobe Connect – http://www.adobe.com/products/acrobatconnectpro  (licensing fee)
Mike Lane (Portland State University) suggested it as an eLearning tool.

·        Wimba Learning Classroom –  http://www.wimba.com/products/integration.php    (license fee) audio and video
Ron Paige (Cleveland State Community College)  replied, “Our small community college is entering the second year of a contract with Wimba Live Classroom (and Wimba Voice Tools, as well). I have played with Vyew — free at the basic level — but find Wimba LC ideal for our distance learning needs. The App Share feature makes it more than a distance learning tool, however. I have instructors using LC both in the classroom and across the county. The new version of Wimba LC (V5.2) includes protocols for multiple types of video input (more than just your webcam), which is a useful feature.          

·         Transparent Language  http://www.transparent.com  
Melanie Reed (IUPUI) writes, “note the upper left link for Educators, the Blogs down center page, and this link for Educators at the bottom: http://www.transparent.com/educators/index.htm” , and adds “
BYKI, is part of this online program and the “lite” version can be downloaded for language labs for free: http://www.byki.com/  It also features a Web 2.0 Widget tool with a word-a-day that can be installed on the desktop.”

Asynchronous:

·         Voice Thread – http://voicethread.com/   (free)  audio and video
Suggested by 
Susan Woerner (SUNY Broome) and Clark Shah-Nelson (SUNY Delhi). 

·         YakPackhttp://www.yackpack.com/   (free) audio and image (no video, as far as I can determine.)  This application looks interesting and Clark Shah-Nelson (SUNY Delhi) recommended it as a possibility.   I’d like to try it.

·         Flickr or a wiki (in general)  http://www.flickr.com 
Susan Woerner (SUNY Broome) mentioned, The other possibility is Flickr since they now have the capacity to include video. It might cost some though because she’s talking about some pretty big storage needs. But that does include the ability to privatize so just she and her class can use it. Otherwise, she could explore using a wiki where she can store video clips. With a wiki she might be able to give each student her/his own page or group students together, etc.”

Weekly Web 2.0 Update – June 30, 2008

This week, my morning thoughts over 2 cups of coffee will be formulated while sitting outdoors at a round, white, chipped and rusted, 60s-style patio table on a deteriorating stone patio in Stanfordville, NY.  I have a spectacular view of the Catskills from the John Johansen Pyramid, high atop Sisters Hill Road.  However, there is no view or signs of civilization on all sides of me.  Right now, I’m having a stare-down with a doe and her two fawns, grazing 50 yards away from me.  The momma deer just won, I blinked first.

Usually, I spend this time browsing the blogs for uses of Web 2.0 in the classroom.  There is no Internet connection at the Pyramid or a coffee house with WiFi in the (hardly can call it a) town of Stanfordville.  Good news, there is electricity and I’m listening to NPR.  I’m not suffering, one little bit, from cyber withdrawal. The NPR host is doing a report on last week’s Personal Democracy Forum Conference in New York.  NPR Senior Producer, Dava Iran Ardalan, had been blogging live from the conference.  Liane Hansen, Weekend Edition host, reviewed a Twitter Debate between McCain and Obama representatives.  And, Elizabeth and John Edwards dropped in on the Monday session via Skype Video.  The theme of the conference seemed to be centered on redefining our democracy in an information age.  

Anymore, “redefining in an information age” seems to be the central theme at our educational conferences.  All factions of our society are going through a “redefining” stage due to electronic media.  We, as educators, have a very important, critical part to play in this redefining stage.   The media industry recognizes this…the entertainment industry recognizes this…businesses and the corporate worlds recognize this…politics and the rest..why doesn’t education?  Why have we marked our lines and drawn swords?  We have.  And, we’re the last ones who should be doing this.  We should be leading the way.
 
Go to Sunday SoapBox at http://www.npr.org/blogs/sundaysoapbox/2008/06/personal_democracy_forum_2008.html and the Personal Democracy Forum at http://www.personaldemocracy.com
Mapping the political blogospherehttp://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20080623-mapping-the-political-blogosphere-personal-democracy-forum-kicks-off.html
For photos of the John Johansen Pyramid go to http://www.flickr.com/photos/nancywozniak/sets/72157605885850647
 
or Nancy Wozniak’s photostream at
http://www.flickr.com/photos/nancywozniak
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Forum Discussions at Web 2.0:  Putting Education through the Changes – http://Web20Group.epsilen.com What the Internet is doing to our brains by Nicholas Carr forum continues to grow with comments and thoughts about Nicholas Carr’s article, “Is Google Making Us Stupid”. The article has caused quite a stir in the blogging community.
New Forums:
-Your First Time in Web 2.0
Program Assessment & electronic portfolios
-Wild, Wonderful World of Wikis
-Building Learning Communities Online

Please browse through and contribute to the forums. Your thoughts and opinions are appreciated.  If you don’t have an Epsilen account, go to http://www.epsilen.com and join.  It’s FREE!
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Member Blogs and Webs Wiki
Check out Elaine Garofoli’s
, SparkFireLearning, instructional technology blog at http://www.sparkfirelearning.com (Highly recommended!)
Post yours on the Member Blog and Wiki site and I’ll add it to our group’s Quicklinks at http://Web20Group.epsilen.com   
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Woz’s Web 2.0 Recommendation of the Week:
wikiHow –
http://www.wikihow.comFor Review, see Wild, Wonderful World of Wikis in our forums or my blog at https://nancywozniak.wordpress.com . Definitely, this is one I’d use in my classroom. Talk about collaborative intelligence. This tool promotes critical thinking. Engage your students in a collaborative How-To project. Let me know what you think? Do you see a use for it, also? What about language, education, science, political science, economics …. The list goes on and on.

Week of June 22 – Web 2.0 Update

This is an update on this week’s wiki and forum posts in the Web 2.0-Putting Education through the Changes group on Epsilen at http://Web20Group.epsilen.com.

SPECIAL REQUEST:
Please send me the URLs to your own academic blogs and I’ll post them in Quick Links. There is a wiki that allows members to post their blogs, websites, twitter, skype info, also. Check out Judy Baker’s blog at http://cccoer.wordpress.comand Melanie Reed posted her archives on Web 2.0 and 3.0 from her Nano Week blog in the wiki area.

COMPELLING POSTS:

The “I LEARNED SOMETHING” FEATURE:
History of Wikipedia http://courseware.hbs.edu/public/cases/wikipedia/Harvard Business School has posted a history of wikipedia, summarizing the key stages of development, as well as policies for managing the dialogue (the policy of handling “articles for deletion” is a great example of democratic action in chaotic public forums http://courseware.hbs.edu/public/cases/wikipedia/). – George Siemens at http://www.elearnspace.org/blog/
Also, Enterprise 2.0 Social Software – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enterprise_2.0

Webinars and Videos
George Siemens – Knowing Knowledge
Presented by SCoPE – http://scope.lidc.sfu.ca/ – SCoPE brings together individuals who share an interest in educational research and practice
George Siemens’ webinars Knowing Knowledge using Elluminate.com – (copy and past URLs into browser)
Part I
https://sas.elluminate.com/site/external/recording/playback/link/meeting.jnlp?suid=M.1AE4AA22455822A6C1E9F3CA77B44B
Part II
https://sas.elluminate.com/site/external/jwsdetect/playback.jnlp?psid=2007-01-24.1325.M.87ECB2CE5B9EB5A52D942E8BB4A423.vcr