Did Einstein really say it?

“The significant problems we face cannot be solved at the same level of thinking when created” – Albert Einstein

Most of us post an inspiring quote from a known leader on the welcome pages of our portfolios. I encourage my students to find a quote and image that represents their own professional strengths for branding purposes. Now, I emphasize that they do more than find a quote from Quoteland. Is the quote authentic and what was the context? I found this post from the abandoned blog, ICARUSFALLING, on the much quoted phrase by Einstien, interesting. It started me thinking about the authenticity of my beloved John Dewey quotes. It also reminded me to stop abandoning my blogs! Pick one and stick to it.

I still like the recreated Einstein quote.  Here’s a variation.

One of the many variations of the quote.
One of the many variations of the quote.

Einstein Enigmatic Quote, ICARUSFALLING, http://icarus-falling.blogspot.com/2009/06/einstein-enigma.html

Bringing Composers into Classrooms Through Skype

Recommended Article:

This Campus Technology article is worth reading and Skype is a Web 2.0 application worth using in the classroom – Bringing Composers into Classrooms Through Skype, by Linda L Briggs, 8/27/2008 – http://www.campustechnology.com/articles/66727 .

It would be interesting to know how many of us are using Skype or other Web 2.0 video conferencing tools (see Wiki area) to bring experts in the field into the classroom. Email me or post a discussion in our our Web 2.0 Epsilen Group Forums. I’ve been thinking about bringing alumni that are experts in certain disciplines into my classroom through Skype. Why not bring the alumni back to campus? We have the Web 2.0 tools to do. What do you think?

WOZ Blog Favorites – technology180.wordpress.com

BlOG RECOMMENDATION:
http://technology180.wordpress.com
Stop running from the technology.  Turn around and try it.

Check out Patsy Crawford Carruthers’ Blog.  Patsy is the Senior Program Manager of Instructional Technology for the Teaching & Academic Support Center (TASC) at the University of Kentucky

Her About Description:
Technology180 is a blog dedicated to tech tools and Web 2.0 resources for teaching and learning. Rather than being a fully rounded look at technology, this blog asks the reader to reverse his or her thinking about using technology in the classroom, if necessary, and apply some new tools to his or her instruction.

The author, “patsycat,” is Patsy Crawford Carruthers, Senior Program Manager of Instructional Technology for the Teaching & Academic Support Center (TASC) at the University of Kentucky. Her bachelor’s degree is in journalism and her master’s is in education. She’s a former journalist and high school English & journalism teacher, and she spent 10 years working for Cincinnati’s public television station in content and educational technology. Entries reflect her own viewpoints and interests and do not represent the University of Kentucky. She blogs because she loves to write.
– – –  – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –
REMEMBER-email me with your blogs, websites and Web 2.0 recommendations (nancywozniak@gmail.com).  I’ll post them.   Join and post them in the wiki area of our Epsilen Web 2.0 Group at http://Web20Group.epsilen.com.   I send weekly update emails to the Epsilen group.    – nancy

The Use of Facebook in Education

This morning, I found a creative use for Facebook in the classroom.   If you are a Facebook member, do a search for “Perseids Meteor Shower”.  If you’re not a member, do a search for Nancy Wozniak and become one of my friends on Facebook.  The link to the Perseids Meteor Shower event appears on my profile.  (RELAX… If you join Facebook, nothing bad will happen to you…you will not be stalked or turn into a toad…I promise 🙂  You’ve got to see this!  This is a Facebook event group where students, faculty and everyone comes together and shares information on the event, viewing tips and meteors in general.  

BTW, this event page was started by 2 high school seniors out of Maryland.  They use a  Facebook group page as an invitation to the event.  They ask you to RSVP.  83,147 guests have confirmed their attendance, 19,823 might be attending and 21,287 have sent their regrets and won’t be in attendance.    Try it and you’ll begin to see some of the benefits of social networking in education.  Let’s get past the ridiculous debate on banning faculty from Facebook.  Let’s get back to teaching and learning.   I can see something like this as an engaging collaborative class project…hmmmmm…my mind is off and running with this one.  http://www.facebook.com