Eric Tremblay’s Active Learning in the Online Classroom

I’ve been doing some research on turning the carved in cold stone, virtual learning management space into a personal, living, breathing, interactive learning place and came across Eric’s post on active learning in the online classroom in his E-Learning Acupuncture blog.  This is an active, interesting blog that I’m posting in my Blogs I Follow page.  He’s taking learning interactions beyond the regular read the content and comment on a linear discussion board assignment.  Of course, reply to at least 3 other posts.  BLAH!  It’s time we move beyond the cold, virtual spaces for online learning and let the students transform the spaces into personal, interactive learning places.  He breaks the interaction and learning activities into 4 different categories.  Brilliant!  (See below)  He lists the activities under each category and is asking for his readers to add to the lists.  Let’s do it!  I would add interactive personal and team portfolios to the a few of the categories.  And, how about under Learner-to-Learner Interactions add digital concept mapping to enhance group brainstorming?  Why not?  As educators our first responsibility is to ensure that our students become productive citizens in society.  Like it or not, our students are transitioning into a workforce that requires mastery of digital media and cyber communication.

Visit Eric’s blog and add to the lists.  Let’s all do this. I’m adding my activities today.  Again, brilliant job, Eric!
http://erictremblay.blogspot.ca/2015/03/active-learning-in-online-classroom.html

Learner-to-Learner Interactions

  • Group brainstorming
  • Group role-playing
  • Study/support groups
  • Peer feedback on student work
  • Exploring a Virtual World as a team
  • Creating visual posters to share with the class
  • Creation of video presentations to share with the class
  • Asynchronous individual or collaborative learning activities (i.e. Projects)
  • Creative writing (in groups or individually) that is shared with peers
  • Problem-based learning Learning activities which encourage critical thinking
  • Cooperative learning group discussions (real time video chat or via asynchronous discussion forum)

Learner-To-TeachingTeam

  • Tutorials
  • Reflective questioning
  • Relating learning to relevant current events and personal life
  • Problem-based learning Learning activities which encourage critical thinking
  • Cooperative learning group discussions (real time video chat or via asynchronous discussion forum)

Learner-To-Virtual Environment

  • Interviewing people
  • Exploring a Virtual World individually
  • Learning activities which encourage critical thinking
  • Online quizzes (graded and non-graded) that provide immediate feedback
  • Advanced adaptive technologies like simulations and sensitivity analyses

Learner-To-Physical Environment 

  • Interviewing people
  • Home-based laboratories
  • Real-life data collection and analysis
  • Learning activities which encourage critical thinking
  • Learning activities with hand-on experiences and tasks
  • Learning activities which apply the content of the lesson in real-life situations

E-Learning Acupuncture, Eric Tromblay, Educational Developer, Queens University

Did Einstein really say it?

“The significant problems we face cannot be solved at the same level of thinking when created” – Albert Einstein

Most of us post an inspiring quote from a known leader on the welcome pages of our portfolios. I encourage my students to find a quote and image that represents their own professional strengths for branding purposes. Now, I emphasize that they do more than find a quote from Quoteland. Is the quote authentic and what was the context? I found this post from the abandoned blog, ICARUSFALLING, on the much quoted phrase by Einstien, interesting. It started me thinking about the authenticity of my beloved John Dewey quotes. It also reminded me to stop abandoning my blogs! Pick one and stick to it.

I still like the recreated Einstein quote.  Here’s a variation.

One of the many variations of the quote.
One of the many variations of the quote.

Einstein Enigmatic Quote, ICARUSFALLING, http://icarus-falling.blogspot.com/2009/06/einstein-enigma.html

Web 2.0 Storytelling

digitalstorytelling_sm

Have you seen the article, “Web 2.0 Storytelling: Emergence of a New Genre” by
Bryan Alexander and Alan Levine?I’m working with active learning in the large lecture classrooms. It’s a challenge, since the large lecture rooms are not designed for active learning and small group discussions. Web 2.0 Storytelling…I’m thinking, “Why not?” The students have their laptops in the large lecture halls and they send IMs and emails throughout the lecture.

The article cites Web 2.0 technologies that can be used for storytelling.  Do you think the physical sciences can use storytelling techniques as well as the social sciences?  Is this a useful active learning method for the large lecture classroom, as well as the smaller classroom settings? Comment or send me a message and let me know what you think. I need your input. How would you use this technique in your classroom? I’ll post your thoughts and suggestions on the Web 2.0 blog.

http://connect.educause.edu/Library/EDUCAUSE+Review/Web20StorytellingEmergenc/47444?time=1226587109

Definition from article – “A story has a beginning, a middle, and a cleanly wrapped-up ending. Whether told around a campfire, read from a book, or played on a DVD, a story goes from point A to B and then C. It follows a trajectory, a Freytag Pyramid—perhaps the line of a human life or the stages of the hero’s journey. A story is told by one person or by a creative team to an audience that is usually quiet, even receptive. Or at least that’s what a story used to be, and that’s how a story used to be told. Today, with digital networks and social media, this pattern is changing. Stories now are open-ended, branching, hyperlinked, cross-media, participatory, exploratory, and unpredictable. And they are told in new ways: Web 2.0 storytelling picks up these new types of stories and runs with them, accelerating the pace of creation and participation while revealing new directions for narratives to flow.”