Media Literacy-The Need Is NOW!

No matter the discipline or topic, ALL educators need to take some class time to discuss media literacy issues. Facebook and other social media forums are being scrutinized for “Fake News.”   A PewResearch survey reported that 62% of U.S adults get their news on social media and two-thirds of Facebook users (66%) get their news on the site.  That’s over half the U.S. population looking to social media for local and national information.   Social Media users often taint their news posts with their personal opinions and embellishments. It becomes Fake News.  We saw the effects during our last Presidential Campaign.  Many folks, particularly our youth, aren’t able to analysis news stories or know how to recognize credible news sources.  They can’t discern what is real and what is fake.   Just because the news comes from a major network broadcast operation, doesn’t mean it’s credible.  Public Radio Internation CEO, Alisa Miller provides an excellent segue into a media literacy class activity with her Ted Talk on the power of the news to distort our worldview.  Media Literacy must be included in our core curriculums.

How the News Distorts Our Worldview
A must see TedTalk by Alisa Miller, CEO, Public Radio International (PRI)As the CEO of Public Radio International, Alisa Miller works to bring the most significant news stories to millions — empowering Americans with the knowledge to make choices in an interconnected world.

Course Design and Online Group Collaboration — What’s the Connection?

Debbie Morrison cuts through the online design rhetoric and provides 5 course design strategies for online group collaboration and activities. This is an informative blog for online course design and professional development.

Online Learning Insights

teamwork

Facilitating group work in an online course for instructors is often the most challenging aspect of teaching an online class. The amount of time invested by students and the instructor in the group process can be significant; unfortunately there’s often more time spent on logistics of the assignment than on meaningful learning. But there is a solution that significantly improves the process and the outcome. It’s course design. Effective course design, which includes the timing, description and instructions for the group project, is a determining factor in the quantity, quality and type of interactivity (Swan, 2001). Facilitation skills of the instructor is another factor, more so when the instructor uses a specific skill set that supports meaningful group interaction. In this post I focus on the course design component. Though I’ve written several posts about group work, I want to share with readers findings from a journal article “Creating Collaborative Learning Groups in an Online Environment” (Brindley, Waiti & Blaschke, 2009) that emphasizes the connection between…

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