Course Design with Multimodal Media

Changing up traditional assignments summarized on Microsoft documents with digital formats such as Prezi presentations, concept maps and infographics, digital storytelling, have be proven to enhance understanding and learning.  Multimodal learning also includes art, music, movement, and drama.  Stony Brook’s Amy Sullivan, Center for Dance, Movement, and Somatic Learning, has her students document learning and movement outcomes with smart phone videos and eportfolios.  It’s not just the Humanities and Arts that build outcome-based assessment around multimodal media learning projects.  Dr. Gary Halada, Associate Professor, Engineering Materials Science, allows students to use various media and presentation formats of their choice for their team final projects in his Disasters in Engineering course.  His students have written and performed poetry, songs, digital stories, short plays, and physical reenactments using props as they conveyed their research and conclusions on the engineering disasters of history to the class.  Share your course designs with multimodal media and resources.  Suggest tools.

Multimodal Media?  NOTE-National Council of English Teachers defines it as the integration of multiple modes of communication and expression can enhance or transform the meaning of the work beyond illustration or decoration.  What does this mean to teaching and learning?  The article summarizes thoughts at  http://www.ncte.org/governance/multimodalliteracies

Other Resources:
The Digital Rhetoric Collaborative is a space for shared inquiry into the range of ideas, conversations, and activities that together constitute the work of digital rhetoricians and of the computers and writing community.: http://www.digitalrhetoriccollaborative.org