Eric Tremblay’s Active Learning in the Online Classroom

I’ve been doing some research on turning the carved in cold stone, virtual learning management space into a personal, living, breathing, interactive learning place and came across Eric’s post on active learning in the online classroom in his E-Learning Acupuncture blog.  This is an active, interesting blog that I’m posting in my Blogs I Follow page.  He’s taking learning interactions beyond the regular read the content and comment on a linear discussion board assignment.  Of course, reply to at least 3 other posts.  BLAH!  It’s time we move beyond the cold, virtual spaces for online learning and let the students transform the spaces into personal, interactive learning places.  He breaks the interaction and learning activities into 4 different categories.  Brilliant!  (See below)  He lists the activities under each category and is asking for his readers to add to the lists.  Let’s do it!  I would add interactive personal and team portfolios to the a few of the categories.  And, how about under Learner-to-Learner Interactions add digital concept mapping to enhance group brainstorming?  Why not?  As educators our first responsibility is to ensure that our students become productive citizens in society.  Like it or not, our students are transitioning into a workforce that requires mastery of digital media and cyber communication.

Visit Eric’s blog and add to the lists.  Let’s all do this. I’m adding my activities today.  Again, brilliant job, Eric!
http://erictremblay.blogspot.ca/2015/03/active-learning-in-online-classroom.html

Learner-to-Learner Interactions

  • Group brainstorming
  • Group role-playing
  • Study/support groups
  • Peer feedback on student work
  • Exploring a Virtual World as a team
  • Creating visual posters to share with the class
  • Creation of video presentations to share with the class
  • Asynchronous individual or collaborative learning activities (i.e. Projects)
  • Creative writing (in groups or individually) that is shared with peers
  • Problem-based learning Learning activities which encourage critical thinking
  • Cooperative learning group discussions (real time video chat or via asynchronous discussion forum)

Learner-To-TeachingTeam

  • Tutorials
  • Reflective questioning
  • Relating learning to relevant current events and personal life
  • Problem-based learning Learning activities which encourage critical thinking
  • Cooperative learning group discussions (real time video chat or via asynchronous discussion forum)

Learner-To-Virtual Environment

  • Interviewing people
  • Exploring a Virtual World individually
  • Learning activities which encourage critical thinking
  • Online quizzes (graded and non-graded) that provide immediate feedback
  • Advanced adaptive technologies like simulations and sensitivity analyses

Learner-To-Physical Environment 

  • Interviewing people
  • Home-based laboratories
  • Real-life data collection and analysis
  • Learning activities which encourage critical thinking
  • Learning activities with hand-on experiences and tasks
  • Learning activities which apply the content of the lesson in real-life situations

E-Learning Acupuncture, Eric Tromblay, Educational Developer, Queens University

Is Your First Grader College Ready?

FEB. 4, 2015

Thought provoking video, Age 6 and Applying to College posted article.
“What is college?  Get that thought into their heads.  Even though they’re 6 years old, they can think about that until they get to  high school and the process becomes real”

This New York Times article brought to mind a post from this blog in which I quoted a condescending educator, perturbed by learning from play,“young students don’t want to learn, they want to play, and presentations like the one I saw today essentially seem to be  saying that we need to support this play (masked as educational needs) as much as possible in order to try to get some learning in there.”  (see Instructor Attitudes and Biases)

Are we undermining the robust worth and value of play and learning?  Our government and schools are in such a hurry to retire seasoned teachers, our schools are losing valuable  wisdom and common sense experience.  Are they still teaching the value of play and learning in our Colleges of Education? Piaget?

The Expert Learning Curve

70:20:10 and the Learning Curve
70:20:10 and the Learning Curve

70:20:10 and the Learning Curve

What does it take to make you an expert?

From Novice to Expert – Clark Quinn’s  Learnlet of the week posted in his Quinnovation blog maps the roles and relationships of the semantic learning process, mentoring and coaching, and experiential practices and reflection.    Quinn ” wanted to emphasize that the 10 only has a small role to play in moving performance from zero to some minimal level, that mentoring and coaching really help improve performance, and that ongoing development requires a supportive environment.”   Though maybe not his point, the curve diagram made me think of how experiential learning practices should be implemented in the novice stages in all disciplines and fields of study.

Back in Ohio, there is a prestigious broadcast media program at an Ohio state university not beginning with THE.  Students strive to get into this program.   Some cry when not accepted.  Many of the students in a Northern Ohio community not accepted in the program attend the local community college’s broadcast media program.  Right from the start, in their freshman year, the students have studio time and produce a local magazine show that is broadcast over the local cable station.  Broadcast journalists from the Cleveland area news market have been know to mentor the students.  Students from the prestigious broad media program don’t put their hands on a studio camera, produce news gathering pieces, or enter an editing suite until their junior year.  The community college students snag working internships by their sophomore year and go on to 4 year colleges and universities to pursue their academic and professional interests.  Some continue on and work in television news.   No matter their chosen professional direction, the community college students amass professional skills and abilities that are valuable to any profession.  I have noticed strong self-determined characteristics in these students (autonomy, self-relatedness, and self-efficacy) that are demonstrated in all their endeavors.

Thought the curve was interesting.  Got me thinking.  Clark Quinn’s blog can be accessed at http://quinnovation.com.

Flipped Classrooms – Turn to your neighbor and create.

You don't need technology to flip your classroom.
You don’t need technology to flip your classroom.

So, what is a flipped classroom and why would you bother?

The concept can be found in the 1995 article by Barr and Tagg, From Teaching to Learning: A New Paradigm for Undergraduate Education.  If you truly want to understand the architecture of a flipped classroom, form a team of discovery and follow along.

Individually,

  1. download –  7 Things You Should Know About Flipped Classrooms  from Educause
  2. View Penn State’s Simply Speaking video on Flipping the Classroom.Listen to the presenter’s challenges.  He starts out negative, but realistic. So, how do you meet the challenges he presents?  What are the benefits of flipping your classroom?  How would you personalize your flipped classroom for?  He presents technology as the answer. Do you always need technology to flip a classroom?  Reply in  comments area of blog.
  3. View Sal Kahn’s Future of Learning.
  4. Continue on with Eutopia’s Five-Minute Film Festival: Flipped Classrooms

With a team (3-4 members per group),

  1. try Nancy Wozniak’s exercise on Map The Concept of Flipped Classrooms.
    In a team, you will brainstorm your own design for a flipped classroom using a concept (mind) map.  Scan and post your concept maps; or,  email the concept maps to me.  Concept maps can be constructed by hand or electronically.  Contact nancy.wozniak@stonybrook.edu for help and suggestions.

For more resources, go to Robert Talbert’s Resources for the Inverted Classroom – Compiled by Robert Talbert – talbertr@gvsu.edu  Robert Talbert’s Blog – http://chronicle.com/blognetwork/castingoutnines
Reply with your challenges, solutions, and insights.  Add your own resources to share with others.

Web 2.0 Meets the Cloud

Many have asked, “What’s the difference between Web 2.0 and the Cloud?”  Tim O’Reilly, credited with the Web 2.0, wrote about the difference in his O’Reilly Radar blog back in 2008. http://radar.oreilly.com/2008/10/web-20-and-cloud-computing.html   He defined the types of cloud computer and I like number 3 on his list,

Cloud-based end-user applications.  Any web application is a cloud application in the sense that it resides in the cloud.  Google, Amazon, Facebook, twitter,  flickr, and virtually every other Web 2.0 application is a cloud application in this sense. However, it seems to me that people use the term “cloud” more specifically in describing web applications that were formerly delivered locally on a PC, like spreadsheets, word processing, databases, and even email.  Thus even though they may reside on the same server farm, people tend to think of gmail or Google docs and spreadsheets as “cloud applications” in a way that they don’t think of Google search or Google maps.

This common usage points up a meaningful difference:  people tend to think differently about cloud applications when they host individual user data.  The prospect of “my” data disappearing or being unavailable is far more alarming than, for example, the disappearance of a service that merely hosts an aggregated view of data that is available elsewhere (say Yahoo! search or Microsoft live maps.)  And that, of course, points us squarely back into the center of the Web 2.0 proposition:  that users add value to the application by their use of it.  Take that away, and you’re a step back in the direction of commodity computing.  (O’Reilly, October 2008)

That was 2008.  What is the difference between Web 2.0 and the Cloud in 2013?  I have my opinion, but what’s yours?  Is it important to know the difference or care?

Nancy Wozniak, Learning Architect and ePortfolio Program Manager Stony Brook University