The Expert Learning Curve

70:20:10 and the Learning Curve
70:20:10 and the Learning Curve

70:20:10 and the Learning Curve

What does it take to make you an expert?

From Novice to Expert – Clark Quinn’s  Learnlet of the week posted in his Quinnovation blog maps the roles and relationships of the semantic learning process, mentoring and coaching, and experiential practices and reflection.    Quinn ” wanted to emphasize that the 10 only has a small role to play in moving performance from zero to some minimal level, that mentoring and coaching really help improve performance, and that ongoing development requires a supportive environment.”   Though maybe not his point, the curve diagram made me think of how experiential learning practices should be implemented in the novice stages in all disciplines and fields of study.

Back in Ohio, there is a prestigious broadcast media program at an Ohio state university not beginning with THE.  Students strive to get into this program.   Some cry when not accepted.  Many of the students in a Northern Ohio community not accepted in the program attend the local community college’s broadcast media program.  Right from the start, in their freshman year, the students have studio time and produce a local magazine show that is broadcast over the local cable station.  Broadcast journalists from the Cleveland area news market have been know to mentor the students.  Students from the prestigious broad media program don’t put their hands on a studio camera, produce news gathering pieces, or enter an editing suite until their junior year.  The community college students snag working internships by their sophomore year and go on to 4 year colleges and universities to pursue their academic and professional interests.  Some continue on and work in television news.   No matter their chosen professional direction, the community college students amass professional skills and abilities that are valuable to any profession.  I have noticed strong self-determined characteristics in these students (autonomy, self-relatedness, and self-efficacy) that are demonstrated in all their endeavors.

Thought the curve was interesting.  Got me thinking.  Clark Quinn’s blog can be accessed at http://quinnovation.com.

Did Einstein really say it?

“The significant problems we face cannot be solved at the same level of thinking when created” – Albert Einstein

Most of us post an inspiring quote from a known leader on the welcome pages of our portfolios. I encourage my students to find a quote and image that represents their own professional strengths for branding purposes. Now, I emphasize that they do more than find a quote from Quoteland. Is the quote authentic and what was the context? I found this post from the abandoned blog, ICARUSFALLING, on the much quoted phrase by Einstien, interesting. It started me thinking about the authenticity of my beloved John Dewey quotes. It also reminded me to stop abandoning my blogs! Pick one and stick to it.

I still like the recreated Einstein quote.  Here’s a variation.

One of the many variations of the quote.
One of the many variations of the quote.

Einstein Enigmatic Quote, ICARUSFALLING, http://icarus-falling.blogspot.com/2009/06/einstein-enigma.html

Is your course designed for instruction or learning?

Learning Paradigm
Learning Paradigm
Instruction Paradigm
Instruction Paradigm

A Checklist for Course Design and Course Evaluation

I use Barr’s and Tagg’s, A New Paradigm for Undergraduate Education, Comparing Educational Paradigms Chart for guiding faculty through course design and students with effective course evaluation.  Items on my checklists are designed and modified from the following four (4) categories with items listed below. (The wording of checklist statements vary from instance to instance of use.) The 1995 article is given to faculty and students for discussion. Surprisingly, some students read it and, after class group discussions, give serious consideration to their course evaluation comments.  The students that read it are the group discussion leaders.  The article and chart are used for pre and post reviews of traditional, hybrid, and online courses by the faculty.  Article:  Robert B. Barr and John Tagg, From Teaching to Learning-A New Paradigm for Undergraduate Education, Change, Vol.27. No. 6 (1995), http://www.maine.edu/pdf/BarrandTagg.pdf

  1. Mission and Purposes

Instruction Paradigm

  • Provide/deliver instruction
  • Transfer knowledge from faculty to students
  • Offer courses and programs
  • Improve the quality of instruction
  • Achieve access for diverse students

Learning Paradigm

  • Produce learning
  • Elicit students discovery and construction of knowledge
  • Create powerful learning environments
  • Improve the quality of learning
  • Achieve success for diverse students student
  1. Criteria for Success

Instruction Paradigm

  • Learning varies
  • Inputs, resources
  • Quality of entering students
  • Curriculum development, expansion
  • Quantity and quality of resources
  • Enrollment, revenue growth
  • Quality of faculty, instruction

Learning Paradigm

  • Learning varies
  • Learning & student-success outcomes
  • Quality of exiting students
  • Learning technologies development
  • Quantity and quality of outcomes
  • Aggregate learning growth, efficiency
  • Quality of students, learning
  1. Teaching/Learning Structures

Instruction Paradigm

  • Atomistic; parts prior to whole
  • Time held constant, learning varies
  • 50-minute lecture,3-unit course
  • Classes start/end at same time
  • One teacher, one classroom
  • Independent disciplines, departments
  • Covering material
  • End-of-course assessment
  • Grading within classes by instructors

Learning Paradigm

  • Holistic; whole prior to parts
  • Learning held constant, time varies
  • Learning environments
  • Environment ready when student is
  • Whatever learning experience works
  • Cross discipline/department
  • Specified learning results
  • Pre/during/post assessments
  • External evaluations of learning
  • Public assessment
  • Degree equals demonstrated knowledge & skills
  1. Learning Theory

Instruction Paradigm

  • Knowledge exists “out there”
  • Knowledge comes in chunks and bits;
  • delivered by instructors and gotten by students

Learning Paradigm

  • Knowledge exists in each person’s mind and is shaped by individual experience

Comments and suggestions are encouraged.  How do you assure that your course designs focus on your students and learning?

Flipped Classrooms – Turn to your neighbor and create.

You don't need technology to flip your classroom.
You don’t need technology to flip your classroom.

So, what is a flipped classroom and why would you bother?

The concept can be found in the 1995 article by Barr and Tagg, From Teaching to Learning: A New Paradigm for Undergraduate Education.  If you truly want to understand the architecture of a flipped classroom, form a team of discovery and follow along.

Individually,

  1. download –  7 Things You Should Know About Flipped Classrooms  from Educause
  2. View Penn State’s Simply Speaking video on Flipping the Classroom.Listen to the presenter’s challenges.  He starts out negative, but realistic. So, how do you meet the challenges he presents?  What are the benefits of flipping your classroom?  How would you personalize your flipped classroom for?  He presents technology as the answer. Do you always need technology to flip a classroom?  Reply in  comments area of blog.
  3. View Sal Kahn’s Future of Learning.
  4. Continue on with Eutopia’s Five-Minute Film Festival: Flipped Classrooms

With a team (3-4 members per group),

  1. try Nancy Wozniak’s exercise on Map The Concept of Flipped Classrooms.
    In a team, you will brainstorm your own design for a flipped classroom using a concept (mind) map.  Scan and post your concept maps; or,  email the concept maps to me.  Concept maps can be constructed by hand or electronically.  Contact nancy.wozniak@stonybrook.edu for help and suggestions.

For more resources, go to Robert Talbert’s Resources for the Inverted Classroom – Compiled by Robert Talbert – talbertr@gvsu.edu  Robert Talbert’s Blog – http://chronicle.com/blognetwork/castingoutnines
Reply with your challenges, solutions, and insights.  Add your own resources to share with others.

Course Design with Multimodal Media

Changing up traditional assignments summarized on Microsoft documents with digital formats such as Prezi presentations, concept maps and infographics, digital storytelling, have be proven to enhance understanding and learning.  Multimodal learning also includes art, music, movement, and drama.  Stony Brook’s Amy Sullivan, Center for Dance, Movement, and Somatic Learning, has her students document learning and movement outcomes with smart phone videos and eportfolios.  It’s not just the Humanities and Arts that build outcome-based assessment around multimodal media learning projects.  Dr. Gary Halada, Associate Professor, Engineering Materials Science, allows students to use various media and presentation formats of their choice for their team final projects in his Disasters in Engineering course.  His students have written and performed poetry, songs, digital stories, short plays, and physical reenactments using props as they conveyed their research and conclusions on the engineering disasters of history to the class.  Share your course designs with multimodal media and resources.  Suggest tools.

Multimodal Media?  NOTE-National Council of English Teachers defines it as the integration of multiple modes of communication and expression can enhance or transform the meaning of the work beyond illustration or decoration.  What does this mean to teaching and learning?  The article summarizes thoughts at  http://www.ncte.org/governance/multimodalliteracies

Other Resources:
The Digital Rhetoric Collaborative is a space for shared inquiry into the range of ideas, conversations, and activities that together constitute the work of digital rhetoricians and of the computers and writing community.: http://www.digitalrhetoriccollaborative.org

The Importance of Change Management in Facilitating Instructional Technology Adoption

Back to foundations … Good reminder for instructional and technology support specialists.

While Technology Continues to Evolve, the “Concerns Based Adoption Model” Remains as Relevant Today as it was in 1987 via The Importance of Change Management in Facilitating Instructional Technology Adoption by KELLY WALSH on AUGUST 31, 2014.

Concern Based Model
Implementing
Technology in Schools:
The Change Agent’s Environment by
Salvatore J. Corda, Ph.D.

Mind and Concept Mapping Tools for Flipping the Classroom

Ignite inquiry and discovery with mind maps.
Ignite inquiry and discovery with mind maps.

Flipping your classroom?  Consider mind and concept mapping.  Instead of your students turning to their neighbors to discuss, have them turn to their neighbors to brainstorm and design.  Simple Post It notes work.  Google Drawing works for electronic maps and infographics.  For online courses, here is an article that lists “24 Essential Mind Mapping and Brainstorming Tools” at http://mashable.com/2013/09/25/mind-mapping-tools.  Alan Henry suggests a few more at http://lifehacker.com/five-best-mind-mapping-tools-476534555.

Look for our Concept Mapping workshops this fall moderated by Nancy Wozniak.  The workshop will be hosted face-to-face and in webinar format.  Email me for more information – nancy.wozniak@stonybrook.edu.

Creative Inquiry in Large Lectures
Creative Inquiry team activities for students in large lectures.

How do you flip your classroom?  Post some more suggestions.

Web 2.0 Meets the Cloud

Many have asked, “What’s the difference between Web 2.0 and the Cloud?”  Tim O’Reilly, credited with the Web 2.0, wrote about the difference in his O’Reilly Radar blog back in 2008. http://radar.oreilly.com/2008/10/web-20-and-cloud-computing.html   He defined the types of cloud computer and I like number 3 on his list,

Cloud-based end-user applications.  Any web application is a cloud application in the sense that it resides in the cloud.  Google, Amazon, Facebook, twitter,  flickr, and virtually every other Web 2.0 application is a cloud application in this sense. However, it seems to me that people use the term “cloud” more specifically in describing web applications that were formerly delivered locally on a PC, like spreadsheets, word processing, databases, and even email.  Thus even though they may reside on the same server farm, people tend to think of gmail or Google docs and spreadsheets as “cloud applications” in a way that they don’t think of Google search or Google maps.

This common usage points up a meaningful difference:  people tend to think differently about cloud applications when they host individual user data.  The prospect of “my” data disappearing or being unavailable is far more alarming than, for example, the disappearance of a service that merely hosts an aggregated view of data that is available elsewhere (say Yahoo! search or Microsoft live maps.)  And that, of course, points us squarely back into the center of the Web 2.0 proposition:  that users add value to the application by their use of it.  Take that away, and you’re a step back in the direction of commodity computing.  (O’Reilly, October 2008)

That was 2008.  What is the difference between Web 2.0 and the Cloud in 2013?  I have my opinion, but what’s yours?  Is it important to know the difference or care?

Nancy Wozniak, Learning Architect and ePortfolio Program Manager Stony Brook University

Language Prejudice and Web 2.0

My colleague, Stephanie Wade, Lecturer SBU Writing and Rhetoric, shared with me, “What speech do we like best? Language expresses who we are, and who we want to be. It can also unite or divide us.” about language prejudice. I had to think of how faculty tend to view our students’ microblogging and texting as dummying down the English language and communications… NIMC (Not In My Classroom). Are our language skills falling to pieces or are we transitioning to another format?  Are Web 2.0 applications ruining the English Language? Should we have writing standards for showcase eportfolios?  I look forward to your comments.

http://www.pbs.org/speak/speech/

Web 2.0 Tools – Has anyone tried these?

SCRIBLINK – ONLINE WHITEBOARD
A colleague of mine, Alexandria Pickett, Director, SUNY Learning Network, posted a link on Facebook to a Web 2.0 online whiteboard.

http://www.scriblink.com/

Scriblink is a free digital whiteboard that users can share online in real-time. Sorta like pen and paper, minus the dead trees, plastic, and the inconvenience of being at the same place at the same time.

We are all about collaboration. Whether you’re here for fun or more practical things like layout planning, concept diagramming, or tutoring a friend in math, Scriblink brings you the power of free hand expression with anyone, at anytime, anywhere in the world.

On the homepage you’ll be immediately directed to a Scriblink board, which is free and requires no registration. Here you can take advantage of all kinds of useful features, such as:

  • Privacy: the board is all yours, open only to the people you choose to invite
  • Dynamic Tools: use shapes, hundreds of colors, a size bar, a text feature, and a grid to help guide your drawings
  • File Options: gives you the ability to print, save, and email your work
  • Image Uploader: upload an image onto the whiteboard as the background, allowing you to share it, mark it, deface it, or highlight key elements
  • In-Screen Chat: when working with others, no need to sign in to third party software, simply use our in-screen chat
  • VOIP Conferencing: if you have a mic for your computer, you can automatically connect with your collaborators (no software necessary) and talk for free for as long as you like
  • File transfer: when emailing is too much of a hassle, simply transfer files directly to anyone you’re working with

I haven’t tried it, but it looks interesting. My problem is there is so much Web 2.0 coming at me, I don’t know where to begin. Does anyone use this or a similar product? Let me know and I’ll post your comments on our Epsilen resource wikki and our Web 2.0 resource blog. Post comments, please.

TINY URL
This was a Web 2.0 service I wasn’t going to use. The name, Tiny URL, bothered me. But, I have to admit, I’ve used it. Academe is home to mile long URLs. Facebook allows so many characters in the link field and that’s it. You can’t post the link.

For instance, the History of the Internet website at 
http://www.yourhtmlsource.com/starthere/historyofthenet.html
(60 characters and what’s the “starthere” in the URL?),
through the TinyURL website becomes
http://tinyurl.com/historyofinternet
(36 characters with more intuitive words in URL)

TinyURL.Com – http://www.tinyurl.com
It’s a simple redirect.

The name still bothers me. The “tinyurl.com” becomes part of the created URL, but shortening the length of a url for a presentation or a reference post is practical. Does anyone else use TinyURL? Are there similar, less irritating services out there?

Web 2.0 Storytelling

digitalstorytelling_sm

Have you seen the article, “Web 2.0 Storytelling: Emergence of a New Genre” by
Bryan Alexander and Alan Levine?I’m working with active learning in the large lecture classrooms. It’s a challenge, since the large lecture rooms are not designed for active learning and small group discussions. Web 2.0 Storytelling…I’m thinking, “Why not?” The students have their laptops in the large lecture halls and they send IMs and emails throughout the lecture.

The article cites Web 2.0 technologies that can be used for storytelling.  Do you think the physical sciences can use storytelling techniques as well as the social sciences?  Is this a useful active learning method for the large lecture classroom, as well as the smaller classroom settings? Comment or send me a message and let me know what you think. I need your input. How would you use this technique in your classroom? I’ll post your thoughts and suggestions on the Web 2.0 blog.

http://connect.educause.edu/Library/EDUCAUSE+Review/Web20StorytellingEmergenc/47444?time=1226587109

Definition from article – “A story has a beginning, a middle, and a cleanly wrapped-up ending. Whether told around a campfire, read from a book, or played on a DVD, a story goes from point A to B and then C. It follows a trajectory, a Freytag Pyramid—perhaps the line of a human life or the stages of the hero’s journey. A story is told by one person or by a creative team to an audience that is usually quiet, even receptive. Or at least that’s what a story used to be, and that’s how a story used to be told. Today, with digital networks and social media, this pattern is changing. Stories now are open-ended, branching, hyperlinked, cross-media, participatory, exploratory, and unpredictable. And they are told in new ways: Web 2.0 storytelling picks up these new types of stories and runs with them, accelerating the pace of creation and participation while revealing new directions for narratives to flow.”

Give us this day our daily Google

Look under the hood of Google Chrome in this comics interpretation of key engineering decisions, by Scott McCloud.
Google Launches its browser. Look under the hood of Google Chrome in this comics interpretation of key engineering decisions, by Scott McCloud.
The Google Debate Rages On!
Ice Breaker IdeaGive us this day our daily Google
I recommend highly this discussion for an ice breaker topic with students in the classroom or faculty development round table sessions. Most everyone knows about Google and has opinions on Google. Start by having participants list the ways they use Google and the Google applications they have tried. Have the participants stand. Ask those to sit down if they use Google more than 10 times a day. Ask the remaining to sit down if they use Google daily. Next, progress down the line of questioning with a few times a week, a couple times a month, now and then. See if any of the participants remain standing. Have them share why they don’t use Google. Keep it light and fun, so no one feels as if they are put on the spot. You can do that same by asking them about their use of Google applications. Open the floor for discussion on Google in education and in our daily lives. Provide resources on using Goggle applications in the classroom. Read the following articles for references and topic ideas:
– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –
Is Google Making Us Stupid?
A few months ago we featured the article, Is Google Making Us Stupid? What the Internet is doing to our brains, by Nicholas Carr. http://www.theatlantic.com/doc/200807/google, The Atlantic.Com.
Read the responses in our What Google is Doing to Our Brains in the Web 2.0 Epsilen forum (please join and contribute) and on my Web 2.0 blog entry, “The Big Bad Google Monster” at https://nancywozniak.wordpress.com/from-the-mind-of-woz/the-big-bad-google-monster/
NOTE: Don’t get upset with my use of the term Luddite. I don’t like the label, but for my review of Carr’s article, I made an exception. Here is my opinion on the label Luddite – https://nancywozniak.wordpress.com/from-the-mind-of-woz/visionaries-vs-luddites/

Give Us This Day Our Daily Google:
NPR’s, Sarah Handel remarks about Google in her life, “– it’s just so darn useful, that I tend to think of it as more of a utility, like water and electricity, than a commercial product… “ – http://www.npr.org/blogs/talk/2008/09/i_cant_quit_you_google.html. Here another take on how Google has become part of our daily sustenance by Rob Dubbin of the Colbert Report (warning: might not be an article for K-12).
Can You Go A Day Without Google?
Google marked its 10th birthday on Sunday. In honor of the day, writer Rob Dubbin decided to see if he could go 24 hours without using the search engine. His article
“Just Let Me Check One Last Thing”
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/09/05/AR2008090502654.html
appeared Sunday in the Washington Post.

Blog of the Nation – I Can’t Quit You, Google
All Things Considered, September 7, 2008
It’s not often that a product or service becomes so pervasive that people start using it as a verb. On the 10th anniversary of Google, take a look back on its influence through the lens of popular culture.
Listen to the NPR broadcast at http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=94392120
and join the read the blog entries at
http://www.npr.org/blogs/talk/2008/09/i_cant_quit_you_google.html
VERY INTERESTING TOPIC!
– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –
Google Chrome Reviews
Nicole, a colleague at work, and I were discussing Michael Piotrowski’s (University of Toledo) announcement post in our Web 2.0 Epsilen Group about the use of Google Chrome for research papers. We both agreed that it’s too new … the jury is still out. I’m creating a forum and a wiki on Google Chrome in the Epsilen Group.

Michael posts, “I wondered if anyone had any inside opinions about the new Google Chrome. Will it make it easier for students to write research papers for my college courses?”

Our Epsilen colleagues, Bob Harbort, Melanie Reed, Mike Pouraryan have responded and I am posting their responses in the Give us this day our daily Google Web 2.0 Epsilen forum. Whether you plan to use Google or not, please join and contribute.

What is it?
Some of you may be asking, “What is Google Chrome?” It’s a browser in its baby (beta) stages. Here’s Wikipedia’s entry – http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Google_Chrome
I’ve been listening to NPR reviews of Chrome on Morning Edition, Talk of the Nation and All things Considered. NPR is a good place to start. Try these sources:

Google’s ‘Shiny’ New Web Browser
NPR.org, September 2, 2008 by Joshua Brockman (RBW – Recommended by Woz)
When Google unveiled its new browser on Tuesday, it was touted as a faster and more reliable experience for those using the Web for everything from e-mail and word processing, to music and video. Go to http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=94211079

Google’s Chrome Taps Browsers’ Cash Potential
Morning Edition, September 9, 2008 • Google is taking on Microsoft’s ubiquitous Internet Explorer with a new browser called Chrome. Technology commentator Mario Armstrong says it’s an easy to use, open-source browser that has a long way to go before it could oust Explorer as the No. 1 browser. Listen at http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=94407506

Google Launches ‘Chrome’ Web Browser
Talk of the Nation, September 5, 2008
Internet search giant Google unveiled Chrome, a new piece of Web browser software on Tuesday. Danny Sullivan, editor-in-chief of SearchEngineLand.com, explains what Google’s open-source browser can do, and why a search engine leader wants to get into the Web software market.
Listen at http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=94299337

Visit the Google Chrome download page and introduction in comic book and video form at
http://www.google.com/chrome/intl/en/features.html

I.E. is Still #1! Let’s see how long it will take Google to overtake them.
Top Five Web Browsers By Market Share
Internet Explorer – 72.2 %
Firefox – 19.7 %
Safari – 6.4 %
Opera – 0.74 %
Netscape- 0.72 %

Source: Net Applications

Bringing Composers into Classrooms Through Skype

Recommended Article:

This Campus Technology article is worth reading and Skype is a Web 2.0 application worth using in the classroom – Bringing Composers into Classrooms Through Skype, by Linda L Briggs, 8/27/2008 – http://www.campustechnology.com/articles/66727 .

It would be interesting to know how many of us are using Skype or other Web 2.0 video conferencing tools (see Wiki area) to bring experts in the field into the classroom. Email me or post a discussion in our our Web 2.0 Epsilen Group Forums. I’ve been thinking about bringing alumni that are experts in certain disciplines into my classroom through Skype. Why not bring the alumni back to campus? We have the Web 2.0 tools to do. What do you think?

RCET – Research Center for Educational Technology – Kent State

RCET Website
You might want to take a look at Kent State’s RCET website … http://www.rcet.org/ . RCET stands for The Research Center for Educational Technology. I attended their conferences and workshops when I was studying Instructional Technology at University of Akron. I highly recommend the experience.

RCET’s mission
To explore the uses and influences of technology in education through rich collaborations among researchers and practitioners, to help improve teaching and learning in today’s classrooms and inform the development of the ubiquitous computing environments of the future.

They publish a journal twice a year and the Spring 2008 edition is a special issue on Learning While Mobile. You can download the PDF at PDF version – http://www.rcetj.org/files/RCETJ_4_1_learningwhilemobile[1].pdf
I’d like to hear your comments on some of the articles. Mobile learning, particularly mobile online learning, seems to be a future trend. I hear mix reviews on the possibilities. What are your thoughts, opinions and experiences with hand held devices in the classroom?

Description of Journal:
The Journal of the Research Center for Educational Technology provides a multimedia forum for the advancement of scholarly work on the effects of technology on teaching and learning.

Articles listed:

•Bridging the Gap? Mobile Phones at the Interface Between Informal and Formal Learning
-Professor John Cook, Norbert Pachler, and Claire Bradley
•Affordances of PDAs: Undergraduate Student Perceptions
-Yanjie Song and Robert Fox
•The Effect of Information Visualization and Structure on Mobile Learning
-Hyungsung Park
•Using Place as Provocation: In Situ Collaborative Narrative Construction
-Matthew Schaefer, Deborah Tatar, Steve Harrison, and Alli Crandell
•A Personalized Mobile Mathematics Tutoring System for Primary Education
-Xinyou Zhao and Toshio Okamoto

The are currently posting a Call for Papers on their website. Again, please share your thoughts and opinions on mobile learning in education. Add comments or join our Web 2.0 group at http://Web20Group.epsilen.com .

Illuminations

Web 2.0 Pick of the Week
http://illuminations.nctm.org/ActivityDetail.aspx?id=36
Illuminations Sound Sketch Tool is a learning exercise that allows students to draw and map sound from National Council of Teachers of Mathmatics. K-12, but the Illuminations site is worth browsing for instructors and tutors in higher education.
Description:
Sound can be measured and quantified in many different ways. Sheet music is one way to represent a series of sounds. MP3 players and computers use a different representation to store a sound. This activity includes software that allows you to sketch and quantify sound using two different representations.

WOZ Blog Favorites – technology180.wordpress.com

BlOG RECOMMENDATION:
http://technology180.wordpress.com
Stop running from the technology.  Turn around and try it.

Check out Patsy Crawford Carruthers’ Blog.  Patsy is the Senior Program Manager of Instructional Technology for the Teaching & Academic Support Center (TASC) at the University of Kentucky

Her About Description:
Technology180 is a blog dedicated to tech tools and Web 2.0 resources for teaching and learning. Rather than being a fully rounded look at technology, this blog asks the reader to reverse his or her thinking about using technology in the classroom, if necessary, and apply some new tools to his or her instruction.

The author, “patsycat,” is Patsy Crawford Carruthers, Senior Program Manager of Instructional Technology for the Teaching & Academic Support Center (TASC) at the University of Kentucky. Her bachelor’s degree is in journalism and her master’s is in education. She’s a former journalist and high school English & journalism teacher, and she spent 10 years working for Cincinnati’s public television station in content and educational technology. Entries reflect her own viewpoints and interests and do not represent the University of Kentucky. She blogs because she loves to write.
– – –  – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –
REMEMBER-email me with your blogs, websites and Web 2.0 recommendations (nancywozniak@gmail.com).  I’ll post them.   Join and post them in the wiki area of our Epsilen Web 2.0 Group at http://Web20Group.epsilen.com.   I send weekly update emails to the Epsilen group.    – nancy

Web Conferencing Tools for Online and Blended Education

I sent out the following request over our Web 2.0 Group’s message system:“I need suggestions for web-based applications that can be used in online language courses. It is important to one of my language professors that the class is able to hear and see one another….audio and video.  She places an emphasis on the movements of the mouth when pronouncing words. I’d appreciate recommendations and advice from my Epsilen colleagues.”
Synchronous:

·         Skype Videohttp://www.skype.com/getconnected/  (free)   audio/video
I (Nancy Wozniak) want to experiment with this application for online or blended language courses.  I’m hearing good things about it from my colleagues in the U.K. and U.S.A.  http://www.skype.com/allfeatures/videocall/#high-quality-video    Suggested by Clark Shah-Nelson (SUNY Delhi), Marianne Dombroski (New York Times), Mike Lane (Portland State University), Clark Shah-Nelson (SUNY Delhi).

·         The Flashmeeting Projecthttp://flashmeeting.open.ac.uk/home.html  (free)  audio/video
This one is new and highly recommended by  Clark Shah-Nelson (SUNY Delhi).  Clark is experimenting with this application for meetings.  I’d like to try it.

·         Facebook – http://www.facebook.com
Clark Shah-Nelson (SUNY Delhi) wrote, “

·         Elluminate (vroom) – http://www.elluminate.com/vroom/index.jsp  (3-person Elluminate solution called Vroom for free— There is a cost for upgrade.)   audio/video
Htay L. Hla (U of Arizona) , Marianne Dombroski (New York Times,  Clark Shah-Nelson (SUNY Delhi) and Susan Woerner (SUNY Broome)suggested Elluminate as a possibility

·         DimDim.com – http://www.dimdim.com/ (free) audio/video
Marianne Dombroski , New York Times, suggests this as a possibility but has heard mixed reviews on the use of the application.

·          Vyew – http://vyew.com/site/  (Free) audio and video
Mike Paige (Cleveland State Community College) has tried it, but loves Wimba LC (licensing fee).

·         Adobe Connect – http://www.adobe.com/products/acrobatconnectpro  (licensing fee)
Mike Lane (Portland State University) suggested it as an eLearning tool.

·        Wimba Learning Classroom –  http://www.wimba.com/products/integration.php    (license fee) audio and video
Ron Paige (Cleveland State Community College)  replied, “Our small community college is entering the second year of a contract with Wimba Live Classroom (and Wimba Voice Tools, as well). I have played with Vyew — free at the basic level — but find Wimba LC ideal for our distance learning needs. The App Share feature makes it more than a distance learning tool, however. I have instructors using LC both in the classroom and across the county. The new version of Wimba LC (V5.2) includes protocols for multiple types of video input (more than just your webcam), which is a useful feature.          

·         Transparent Language  http://www.transparent.com  
Melanie Reed (IUPUI) writes, “note the upper left link for Educators, the Blogs down center page, and this link for Educators at the bottom: http://www.transparent.com/educators/index.htm” , and adds “
BYKI, is part of this online program and the “lite” version can be downloaded for language labs for free: http://www.byki.com/  It also features a Web 2.0 Widget tool with a word-a-day that can be installed on the desktop.”

Asynchronous:

·         Voice Thread – http://voicethread.com/   (free)  audio and video
Suggested by 
Susan Woerner (SUNY Broome) and Clark Shah-Nelson (SUNY Delhi). 

·         YakPackhttp://www.yackpack.com/   (free) audio and image (no video, as far as I can determine.)  This application looks interesting and Clark Shah-Nelson (SUNY Delhi) recommended it as a possibility.   I’d like to try it.

·         Flickr or a wiki (in general)  http://www.flickr.com 
Susan Woerner (SUNY Broome) mentioned, The other possibility is Flickr since they now have the capacity to include video. It might cost some though because she’s talking about some pretty big storage needs. But that does include the ability to privatize so just she and her class can use it. Otherwise, she could explore using a wiki where she can store video clips. With a wiki she might be able to give each student her/his own page or group students together, etc.”

Compress Yourself – Tag Cloud Your Resume

Recently, I received a message from my colleague, Htay Hla, Director of Information Technology at University of Arizona. Htay is a member of our Epsilen Web 2.0 group. He had put one of my posted journal articles through a tag cloud generator, Tag Crowd. He sent the generated tag cloud to me in a pdf format. I thought, “AMAZING! Could this be a tool for the classroom?” I tried it. I put my resume through the Tag Crowd. Look! It’s me, professionally compressed!

Nancy Wozniak Professional Tag Cloud

Go to the site – http://www.tagcrowd.com and catch a vision. I see it used in visual arts, economics, writing, history, biology … you name it. Try it. Let me know what you think.

The Use of Facebook in Education

This morning, I found a creative use for Facebook in the classroom.   If you are a Facebook member, do a search for “Perseids Meteor Shower”.  If you’re not a member, do a search for Nancy Wozniak and become one of my friends on Facebook.  The link to the Perseids Meteor Shower event appears on my profile.  (RELAX… If you join Facebook, nothing bad will happen to you…you will not be stalked or turn into a toad…I promise 🙂  You’ve got to see this!  This is a Facebook event group where students, faculty and everyone comes together and shares information on the event, viewing tips and meteors in general.  

BTW, this event page was started by 2 high school seniors out of Maryland.  They use a  Facebook group page as an invitation to the event.  They ask you to RSVP.  83,147 guests have confirmed their attendance, 19,823 might be attending and 21,287 have sent their regrets and won’t be in attendance.    Try it and you’ll begin to see some of the benefits of social networking in education.  Let’s get past the ridiculous debate on banning faculty from Facebook.  Let’s get back to teaching and learning.   I can see something like this as an engaging collaborative class project…hmmmmm…my mind is off and running with this one.  http://www.facebook.com

Weekly Web 2.0 Update – June 30, 2008

This week, my morning thoughts over 2 cups of coffee will be formulated while sitting outdoors at a round, white, chipped and rusted, 60s-style patio table on a deteriorating stone patio in Stanfordville, NY.  I have a spectacular view of the Catskills from the John Johansen Pyramid, high atop Sisters Hill Road.  However, there is no view or signs of civilization on all sides of me.  Right now, I’m having a stare-down with a doe and her two fawns, grazing 50 yards away from me.  The momma deer just won, I blinked first.

Usually, I spend this time browsing the blogs for uses of Web 2.0 in the classroom.  There is no Internet connection at the Pyramid or a coffee house with WiFi in the (hardly can call it a) town of Stanfordville.  Good news, there is electricity and I’m listening to NPR.  I’m not suffering, one little bit, from cyber withdrawal. The NPR host is doing a report on last week’s Personal Democracy Forum Conference in New York.  NPR Senior Producer, Dava Iran Ardalan, had been blogging live from the conference.  Liane Hansen, Weekend Edition host, reviewed a Twitter Debate between McCain and Obama representatives.  And, Elizabeth and John Edwards dropped in on the Monday session via Skype Video.  The theme of the conference seemed to be centered on redefining our democracy in an information age.  

Anymore, “redefining in an information age” seems to be the central theme at our educational conferences.  All factions of our society are going through a “redefining” stage due to electronic media.  We, as educators, have a very important, critical part to play in this redefining stage.   The media industry recognizes this…the entertainment industry recognizes this…businesses and the corporate worlds recognize this…politics and the rest..why doesn’t education?  Why have we marked our lines and drawn swords?  We have.  And, we’re the last ones who should be doing this.  We should be leading the way.
 
Go to Sunday SoapBox at http://www.npr.org/blogs/sundaysoapbox/2008/06/personal_democracy_forum_2008.html and the Personal Democracy Forum at http://www.personaldemocracy.com
Mapping the political blogospherehttp://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20080623-mapping-the-political-blogosphere-personal-democracy-forum-kicks-off.html
For photos of the John Johansen Pyramid go to http://www.flickr.com/photos/nancywozniak/sets/72157605885850647
 
or Nancy Wozniak’s photostream at
http://www.flickr.com/photos/nancywozniak
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Forum Discussions at Web 2.0:  Putting Education through the Changes – http://Web20Group.epsilen.com What the Internet is doing to our brains by Nicholas Carr forum continues to grow with comments and thoughts about Nicholas Carr’s article, “Is Google Making Us Stupid”. The article has caused quite a stir in the blogging community.
New Forums:
-Your First Time in Web 2.0
Program Assessment & electronic portfolios
-Wild, Wonderful World of Wikis
-Building Learning Communities Online

Please browse through and contribute to the forums. Your thoughts and opinions are appreciated.  If you don’t have an Epsilen account, go to http://www.epsilen.com and join.  It’s FREE!
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Member Blogs and Webs Wiki
Check out Elaine Garofoli’s
, SparkFireLearning, instructional technology blog at http://www.sparkfirelearning.com (Highly recommended!)
Post yours on the Member Blog and Wiki site and I’ll add it to our group’s Quicklinks at http://Web20Group.epsilen.com   
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Woz’s Web 2.0 Recommendation of the Week:
wikiHow –
http://www.wikihow.comFor Review, see Wild, Wonderful World of Wikis in our forums or my blog at https://nancywozniak.wordpress.com . Definitely, this is one I’d use in my classroom. Talk about collaborative intelligence. This tool promotes critical thinking. Engage your students in a collaborative How-To project. Let me know what you think? Do you see a use for it, also? What about language, education, science, political science, economics …. The list goes on and on.