Is Your First Grader College Ready?

FEB. 4, 2015

Thought provoking video, Age 6 and Applying to College posted article.
“What is college?  Get that thought into their heads.  Even though they’re 6 years old, they can think about that until they get to  high school and the process becomes real”

This New York Times article brought to mind a post from this blog in which I quoted a condescending educator, perturbed by learning from play,“young students don’t want to learn, they want to play, and presentations like the one I saw today essentially seem to be  saying that we need to support this play (masked as educational needs) as much as possible in order to try to get some learning in there.”  (see Instructor Attitudes and Biases)

Are we undermining the robust worth and value of play and learning?  Our government and schools are in such a hurry to retire seasoned teachers, our schools are losing valuable  wisdom and common sense experience.  Are they still teaching the value of play and learning in our Colleges of Education? Piaget?

The Expert Learning Curve

70:20:10 and the Learning Curve
70:20:10 and the Learning Curve

70:20:10 and the Learning Curve

What does it take to make you an expert?

From Novice to Expert – Clark Quinn’s  Learnlet of the week posted in his Quinnovation blog maps the roles and relationships of the semantic learning process, mentoring and coaching, and experiential practices and reflection.    Quinn ” wanted to emphasize that the 10 only has a small role to play in moving performance from zero to some minimal level, that mentoring and coaching really help improve performance, and that ongoing development requires a supportive environment.”   Though maybe not his point, the curve diagram made me think of how experiential learning practices should be implemented in the novice stages in all disciplines and fields of study.

Back in Ohio, there is a prestigious broadcast media program at an Ohio state university not beginning with THE.  Students strive to get into this program.   Some cry when not accepted.  Many of the students in a Northern Ohio community not accepted in the program attend the local community college’s broadcast media program.  Right from the start, in their freshman year, the students have studio time and produce a local magazine show that is broadcast over the local cable station.  Broadcast journalists from the Cleveland area news market have been know to mentor the students.  Students from the prestigious broad media program don’t put their hands on a studio camera, produce news gathering pieces, or enter an editing suite until their junior year.  The community college students snag working internships by their sophomore year and go on to 4 year colleges and universities to pursue their academic and professional interests.  Some continue on and work in television news.   No matter their chosen professional direction, the community college students amass professional skills and abilities that are valuable to any profession.  I have noticed strong self-determined characteristics in these students (autonomy, self-relatedness, and self-efficacy) that are demonstrated in all their endeavors.

Thought the curve was interesting.  Got me thinking.  Clark Quinn’s blog can be accessed at http://quinnovation.com.