Web 2.0 Tools – Has anyone tried these?

SCRIBLINK – ONLINE WHITEBOARD
A colleague of mine, Alexandria Pickett, Director, SUNY Learning Network, posted a link on Facebook to a Web 2.0 online whiteboard.

http://www.scriblink.com/

Scriblink is a free digital whiteboard that users can share online in real-time. Sorta like pen and paper, minus the dead trees, plastic, and the inconvenience of being at the same place at the same time.

We are all about collaboration. Whether you’re here for fun or more practical things like layout planning, concept diagramming, or tutoring a friend in math, Scriblink brings you the power of free hand expression with anyone, at anytime, anywhere in the world.

On the homepage you’ll be immediately directed to a Scriblink board, which is free and requires no registration. Here you can take advantage of all kinds of useful features, such as:

  • Privacy: the board is all yours, open only to the people you choose to invite
  • Dynamic Tools: use shapes, hundreds of colors, a size bar, a text feature, and a grid to help guide your drawings
  • File Options: gives you the ability to print, save, and email your work
  • Image Uploader: upload an image onto the whiteboard as the background, allowing you to share it, mark it, deface it, or highlight key elements
  • In-Screen Chat: when working with others, no need to sign in to third party software, simply use our in-screen chat
  • VOIP Conferencing: if you have a mic for your computer, you can automatically connect with your collaborators (no software necessary) and talk for free for as long as you like
  • File transfer: when emailing is too much of a hassle, simply transfer files directly to anyone you’re working with

I haven’t tried it, but it looks interesting. My problem is there is so much Web 2.0 coming at me, I don’t know where to begin. Does anyone use this or a similar product? Let me know and I’ll post your comments on our Epsilen resource wikki and our Web 2.0 resource blog. Post comments, please.

TINY URL
This was a Web 2.0 service I wasn’t going to use. The name, Tiny URL, bothered me. But, I have to admit, I’ve used it. Academe is home to mile long URLs. Facebook allows so many characters in the link field and that’s it. You can’t post the link.

For instance, the History of the Internet website at 
http://www.yourhtmlsource.com/starthere/historyofthenet.html
(60 characters and what’s the “starthere” in the URL?),
through the TinyURL website becomes
http://tinyurl.com/historyofinternet
(36 characters with more intuitive words in URL)

TinyURL.Com – http://www.tinyurl.com
It’s a simple redirect.

The name still bothers me. The “tinyurl.com” becomes part of the created URL, but shortening the length of a url for a presentation or a reference post is practical. Does anyone else use TinyURL? Are there similar, less irritating services out there?

Web 2.0 Storytelling

digitalstorytelling_sm

Have you seen the article, “Web 2.0 Storytelling: Emergence of a New Genre” by
Bryan Alexander and Alan Levine?I’m working with active learning in the large lecture classrooms. It’s a challenge, since the large lecture rooms are not designed for active learning and small group discussions. Web 2.0 Storytelling…I’m thinking, “Why not?” The students have their laptops in the large lecture halls and they send IMs and emails throughout the lecture.

The article cites Web 2.0 technologies that can be used for storytelling.  Do you think the physical sciences can use storytelling techniques as well as the social sciences?  Is this a useful active learning method for the large lecture classroom, as well as the smaller classroom settings? Comment or send me a message and let me know what you think. I need your input. How would you use this technique in your classroom? I’ll post your thoughts and suggestions on the Web 2.0 blog.

http://connect.educause.edu/Library/EDUCAUSE+Review/Web20StorytellingEmergenc/47444?time=1226587109

Definition from article – “A story has a beginning, a middle, and a cleanly wrapped-up ending. Whether told around a campfire, read from a book, or played on a DVD, a story goes from point A to B and then C. It follows a trajectory, a Freytag Pyramid—perhaps the line of a human life or the stages of the hero’s journey. A story is told by one person or by a creative team to an audience that is usually quiet, even receptive. Or at least that’s what a story used to be, and that’s how a story used to be told. Today, with digital networks and social media, this pattern is changing. Stories now are open-ended, branching, hyperlinked, cross-media, participatory, exploratory, and unpredictable. And they are told in new ways: Web 2.0 storytelling picks up these new types of stories and runs with them, accelerating the pace of creation and participation while revealing new directions for narratives to flow.”